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Remodeling - Sakiyama Construction Ltd. - Quality Construction Since 1954

Remodeling


1960s Bungalow

1960s Bungalow

Sakiyama Construction remodeled this 2,800 sq ft house custom built in 1964, modernizing it to meet the advancements of the 2000s. Essential upgrades included new roofing, eave troughs, attic insulation, windows, garage door and security system, and installation of an HRV to provide needed air exchange. Driveways, patios
  1960s Bungalow
and sidewalks were all replaced with interlocking stone.

1960s Bungalow   1960s Bungalow

Sakiyama Construction first worked on this house in 1989, designing and constructing an all season sunroom to replace the screen porch at the rear of the home (above upper left). The room now needed little more than paint, varnish and some decorative updating, but an unused old built-in BBQ (above lower left) still remained from the screened room era. This time, it was converted into a fireplace with slate surround and copper doors, creating a new focal point for the room.

1960s Bungalow

1960s Bungalow   Working with the homeowner and Michelle Weibe of W Design Group, kitchen, bathrooms, bedrooms, laundry, lighting, flooring, plumbing and painting were completely redone.

Existing wood walls in the foyer, living, dining and family rooms were restored, retaining the 60's flavour that made this home unique. Other original features such as worn oak parquet flooring, wrought iron railing and dated lights (above left) were replaced, the new strip maple hardwood flooring and modern fixtures brightening the home and creating a welcoming entrance.

1960s Bungalow   1960s Bungalow

The kitchen was completely redone, with maple cabinets, granite countertops, painted glass backsplash, new appliances, comfortable cork floors and pot lights. The island was reconfigured, containing the dishwasher as well as shelves for cookbooks.

1960s Bungalow

In the new island, the sink was moved to be next to the dishwasher. Undersink drawers replaced the usual cupboards, increasing easily accessible storage space.

The previous pass-through (above) between kitchen and dining room was eliminated to permit the installation of new built in ovens.
  1960s Bungalow

1960s Bungalow   1960s Bungalow

Contemporary lighting, new lighter (maple) cabinetry, new triple pane windows and a custom stainless and glass table modernized the kitchen dining space.

1960s Bungalow

All old windows were updated to new triple pane units. Lighting was modernized and old berber was replaced by new wool carpet. Wood walls were restored. The pass-through area seen in kitchen photos was covered on the dining room side by stained-to-match cherry plywood, creating a new sitting area and place for art.
  1960s Bungalow

1960s Bungalow   1960s Bungalow

Original extensive bathroom tiling was in such good shape it was retained and repaired, providing an element of 60s flair. New vanity, granite countertop, plumbing fixtures, lighting with new bulkhead, and flooring were coordinated with the tile.

1960s Bungalow

The original small bathtub located in a dark alcove and the adjacent linen closet (above) were replaced by a larger modern airtub, new lighting and walls covered in granite tiles to match the vanity countertop.
  1960s Bungalow

1960s Bungalow   1960s Bungalow

This tiny claustrophobic ensuite (above) appeared much larger post renovation (left), the result of replacing the fiberglass shower with a new glass one. Mirrored wall, floating vanity, pale cork floors and painted walls completed the transition.

1960s Bungalow

New shelving and cupboards added much needed storage to the laundry. New energy efficient appliances, granite countertop, riverstone backsplash, updated lighting and easy to stand on cork floors made the laundry into a multipurpose room, a place one wanted to spend time.
  1960s Bungalow

1960s Bungalow

1960s Bungalow
  Changing family needs were met with the conversion of seldom used rooms into new office, exercise and hobby areas.

Gold Award Winner – Basement Development

The next phase of renovation was the development of the lower level. The wish
  Gold Award Winner – Basement Development
list was long - games room with wet bar and sculpture niche, powder room, utility area and walk-in closet – but the space was small, only 480 sq ft. The lower level had to match the home's elegance, especially since the existing basement entrance was an open stairwell in the front foyer (above left). A closed door and walls isolated the original lower stairwell, making the basement seem cramped. Removal of door and wall plus replacing the wrought iron with clear tempered glass and stainless steel half wall and railing opens up the lower level and looks stunning in the foyer (above). A large sculpture niche at the stair base entices exploration of the lower level.

Gold Award Winner – Basement Development

The minimally developed concrete basement which had been used for storage and utilities, had a structural slab floor surrounded by piled grade beams creating three crawl spaces. Height to floor joists was 7 ft 5 in with heating ducts running below (above). Sakiyama Construction did everything possible to increase space and worked with the homeowner and interior designer Michelle Weibe (W Design) to adapt plans to maximize the room's potential. Heating ducts were replaced with flat ducts and furring to support the drywall at maximum height. Side wall framing was of minimum thickness. Visual space was further increased with mirrored walls.
  Gold Award Winner – Basement Development

Gold Award Winner – Basement Development

Limited space did not permit a regular bar. Custom cherry drink ledges and a counter of exotic Matrix granite provides design interest as well as a place for beverages and snacks. Slate ledgestone visually anchors the room and is echoed in the custom stools and art.
  Gold Award Winner – Basement Development

Gold Award Winner – Basement Development   Gold Award Winner – Basement Development

Custom millwork by AMX Woodworking is made of alder finished in a semi-transparent black stain to permit some wood grain to be visible.  The cabinetry provides concealment of crawl space access and utilities (above left) as well as storage (above left and right) and visual appeal in a minimum of space.

Gold Award Winner – Basement Development

Gold Award Winner – Basement Development
  To make the basement roomier and more appealing, Grant Sakiyama suggested the basement door and side wall (above left) be removed. This opened the lower level to the main floor and increased the room width by 3 ½ feet with the new tempered glass railing emphasizing the additional space. Beneath the stairs, custom millwork includes bar cabinetry and floating shelves that create spaces for art and audiovisual equipment as well as for cube chairs. The original basement had no roughed-in plumbing and it required considerable modification before the bar could be developed.

Gold Award Winner – Basement Development

The mantra for this project was make every inch count, both space-wise and detail-wise.  Within a 5 x 7.5 ft wall space, Sakiyama Construction developed the following: fully functional wet bar with striking bar sink and faucet and Matrix granite surround, liquor storage above sink, hidden bar fridge, full extension slide-out counter, and art niche as well as drawer and under-cabinet storage.
  Gold Award Winner – Basement Development

Gold Award Winner – Basement Development

Gold Award Winner – Basement Development
  Original east wall (left) was demolished to make room for major plumbing modifications. New partition walls were relocated to make space for the art niche, a small hallway, new utility closet and new powder room. An ultrathin LED TV and surround sound/DVD system fit into a 2 inch recess in a wall that on its reverse houses electrical panels and plumbing (below left). Visual space is further increased with glass detailed potlights (below right) instead of a pendant fixture over the pool table. Note the engineered ironwood floor chosen to match the existing cherry wall panels.

Gold Award Winner – Basement Development

Gold Award Winner – Basement Development

On locating rough-in plumbing, an improperly graded main sewer line was discovered that created an intermittent sewage smell. This necessitated saw-cutting the floor and replacing the line (above). Poorly draining weeping tiles were remedied by a new sump pit installation. After concrete repair, a Delta FL subfloor was installed to isolate moisture and cold and all exterior walls were insulated with urethane spray foam. Ultimately, an elegant powder room (right) was created in the original space shown above.
  Gold Award Winner – Basement Development

Gold Award Winner – Basement Development   Gold Award Winner – Basement Development

Opposite view of the powder room shows the transformation from rough partition wall (above left) to the unique sink and floating vanity pictured above and at right.  Note the space-saving towel niche.
  Gold Award Winner – Basement Development

Gold Award Winner – Basement Development   Gold Award Winner – Basement Development

Another theme of this renovation was clever concealment. The paneled wall detail shown left adds interest and elegance to the powder room but is functional as well. The panels were positioned and sized so that two upper sections could be opened (above centre) to cover existing crawl space access (top right).

Gold Award Winner – Basement Development   Existing storage space in the basement (left) was redesigned as a formal walk-in closet (below). Custom wall units were built for hanging clothes and custom shelving provides shoe and accessory storage. T-bar ceiling with pot lighting provides a finished look yet permits access to kitchen utilities above. Cork floors are attractive yet functional.

Gold Award Winner – Basement Development

Gold Award Winner – Basement Development

Gold Award Winner – Basement Development
  Additional clever concealment designed by Sakiyama Construction is the enclosure of the furnace, hot water tank, Central vac and HRV(below), all of which were located along one wall (left) in the original basement. The following photos show the exterior of the finished utility room.

Gold Award Winner – Basement Development   Gold Award Winner – Basement Development

Access to the now-enclosed utilities is maintained by three doors, the first in the new small hallway (above left), and the other two in the closet (above right).  Bi-fold doors provide ventilation as well as design detail, and leave enough room for a full length mirror.  A flip-up panel matching the cabinetry hides the HRV unit.